Share: Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn I recommend visiting cushmanwakefield.com to read:%0A%0A {0} %0A%0A {1}
sustainability-in-the-built-environment-everyone-plays-a-part sustainability-in-the-built-environment-everyone-plays-a-part

Sustainability in the built environment – everyone plays a part

22/04/2019

The built environment is a major contributor to green house gas emissions and is also a major consumer of power and water. Not only does this place pressure on the environment, it also creates considerable costs of occupation. In the event of a major environmental incident, increased pressure will be placed on a city’s power and water infrastructure and so any building that is self sufficient or can operate more efficiently will be at an advantage.

Singapore is fairly prepped to keep its built environment sustainable. It scored #2 in Cushman & Wakefield’s 2018 Prepped Cities Index. The index assessed the current state of preparedness of 17 major business centres in the Asia Pacific region based on a wide range of macroeconomic, structural, defensive and social indicators, including factors in the built environment. Singapore scored high for its ability to prevent and manage an environment-related crisis against future uncertainty.

This has very much been driven top-down through a series of regulatory requirements pushed out by government but it is encouraging that the push is starting to come from the wider market too.

Meeting Green Standards

The Building Construction Authority has a target for 80 per cent of buildings in Singapore to achieve Green Mark Standards by 2030. It is actively working with building owners and their tenants to save energy and water, recycle and re-use in the drive to go green. As of May 2018, more than 36 per cent of building projects’ Gross Floor Areas in Singapore have met the green buildings standards.

The sustainability push for the built environment is going to get another nudge when the state planners roll out the CBD incentive scheme to redevelop older buildings. Building owners who are planning to seek redevelopment approval for their buildings will have to meet a minimum score of Green Mark Platinum for their new building before they seek to intensify the use of the land. That’s another leg up for environmental sustainability.

Technology Empowering Sustainable Development

Regulations aside, technology is also an enabler in taking Singapore to a higher plane on sustainability, looking towards a zero waste economy. Carbon tax has been one way to stop the major emitters but to get all on board, renewable energy certificates is being touted as the next frontier. SP Group launched a digital marketplace recently to link buyers and sellers of Renewable Energy Certificates, or green credits, to offset their use of non-clean energy. Blockchain technology is powering the platform. What this does is to help companies achieve greener business operations and meet their sustainability targets. Renewable Energy Certificates are gaining favour amongst corporates in meeting sustainability goals because they off set carbon emissions directly compared to carbon credits which require more steps to procure. Carbon credits involve multiple conversions and are computed based on the other power plants operated in the region.

Beyond corporates, the community as well as the individuals who collectively use and re-use energy are key to achieving sustainability. Consumer habits, lifestyle, perceptions and choices they make in favour of protecting the environment will make the difference.

Related Insights

Q3 Greater China Capital Markets Webinar: Spotlight on Beijing
Insights • Capital Markets

Cushman & Wakefield Q3 Greater China Capital Markets Webinar: Spotlight on Beijing

As China emerges from the COVID-19 outbreak ahead of other major global economies, what’s the current status of the country’s commercial real estate (CRE) market and where is it headed?
Gordon Liu • 04/11/2021
Data-Center-Update_web-card
Research • Data Center

APAC Data Centre Update

Continued growth across the reviewed markets of Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, and Jakarta collectively have 750 MW under construction.
Kevin Imboden • 18/10/2021
Super Low Energy (SLE) buildings are the way forward
Insights • Sustainability

Super low energy (SLE) buildings are the way forward

It is highly encouraging that the push for Super Low Energy (SLE) buildings is gaining traction here in Singapore. Recently, the Building and Construction Authority (BCA) noted that there is an uptick in interest from the industry to mainstream SLE buildings from 2030 onwards.
Zhenyi Lee • 18/10/2021
With your permission we and our partners would like to use cookies in order to access and record information and process personal data, such as unique identifiers and standard information sent by a device to ensure our website performs as expected, to develop and improve our products, and for advertising and insight purposes.

Alternatively click on More Options and select your preferences before providing or refusing consent. Some processing of your personal data may not require your consent, but you have a right to object to such processing.

You can change your preferences at any time by returning to this site or clicking on Privacy & Cookies.
MORE OPTIONS
AGREE AND CLOSE
These cookies ensure that our website performs as expected,for example website traffic load is balanced across our servers to prevent our website from crashing during particularly high usage.
These cookies allow our website to remember choices you make (such as your user name, language or the region you are in) and provide enhanced features. These cookies do not gather any information about you that could be used for advertising or remember where you have been on the internet.
These cookies allow us to work with our marketing partners to understand which ads or links you have clicked on before arriving on our website or to help us make our advertising more relevant to you.
Agree All
Reject All
SAVE SETTINGS